Just to say: the new issue of Saucy will be available in October 2012.
This issue is about Dangerous Food (available here). 

Skirting the edge of tolerance and allergy. Rare, extreme reactions to consumption. Food ruts. The tedious in the trendy. A popular snack that should kill hundreds a year, and inexplicably doesn’t.
Shot in Rockland, Maine, the third issue of Saucy magazine explores desire, intuition, and the diabolical habits that complicate feeding each other and ourselves. 

Just to say: the new issue of Saucy will be available in October 2012.

This issue is about Dangerous Food (available here). 

Skirting the edge of tolerance and allergy. Rare, extreme reactions to consumption. Food ruts. The tedious in the trendy. A popular snack that should kill hundreds a year, and inexplicably doesn’t.

Shot in Rockland, Maine, the third issue of Saucy magazine explores desire, intuition, and the diabolical habits that complicate feeding each other and ourselves. 

Sunday dinner: roasted pork tenderloin with mustard-sorrel sauce, potatoes Lyonnaise, applesauce

Recipes for a Sunday night - this is how to put the whole meal together. It takes about an hour in total. (Recipes are for 2, multiply and divide as needed. You can also add a nice kale salad, just rub the salt into the leaves to soften them.)

1. Bring medium pot of water to boil while slicing two Russet potatoes thinly (1/4 inch thick). Add them and salt the water, cover, bring it to a boil. Boil two minutes. Drain potatoes, let cool. 

2. Put oven to 450 degrees. Halve and peel a large onion; saute for 5 min in pan over medium. Add a clove or two of minced garlic and stir in at the end. Put in bowl. Add 4 tbsp butter to pan and melt. 

3. Layer potatoes and onions in pan, going to edges of pan and pressing down firmly. Bake for 15 minutes in oven. 

4. Rub pork tenderloin (about a pound) with olive oil and season with salt, pepper, fennel pollen (if available). Place on parchment paper on baking sheet on the other oven rack and roast for 25 minutes. Pork should be 145 degrees F internal temperature. Let sit for five minutes, then slice 1/4 inch thick medallions. 

5. Meanwhile, chop 4 apples - I like every variety for this, MacIntosh and Macoun break down especially nicely - and toss in a saucpan with 1/2 cup water with a cinnamon stick. Cover and simmer 20 minutes. Remove cinnamon stick and squeeze lemon over at the end. 

6. To plate, remove potatoes from pan and arrange on half of each plate and then a leftover platter. In empty pan with rest of oil, add a splash of sherry vinegar, then a few tablespoons of heavy cream, let bubble for 2 minutes, then add 1 tbsp Dijon mustard, then a handful of chopped sorrel if you have it. 

7. Slice tenderloin and array on other side of plate, spoon sauce over. Serve applesauce separately in bowls. Season. 

slavin
So, the marvelous Brainpicker just tweeted about the Fall issue, which means smart, brainy sorts of people might head here (hello!)
There are a few copies left of the issue after the New York launch party, and I wasn’t sure whether I’d do this, but…
I made a Goodsie store to sell copies, so if you’d like one, you can order it here and since I’m new to Goodsie, send me a little note to hello @ thesaucymag . com with your name and snail mail address to confirm the order and we’ll figure out any details in delivering it to your home or office or coworking space. 
Thanks for stopping by - the next issue will be out in mid-November, with any luck.  
photo via slavin

So, the marvelous Brainpicker just tweeted about the Fall issue, which means smart, brainy sorts of people might head here (hello!)

There are a few copies left of the issue after the New York launch party, and I wasn’t sure whether I’d do this, but…

I made a Goodsie store to sell copies, so if you’d like one, you can order it here and since I’m new to Goodsie, send me a little note to hello @ thesaucymag . com with your name and snail mail address to confirm the order and we’ll figure out any details in delivering it to your home or office or coworking space. 

Thanks for stopping by - the next issue will be out in mid-November, with any luck.  

photo via slavin

Issue #2 Launch Party September 27th

To celebrate the new issue of Saucy, we’re having a party:

Sept 27th, 6-9p
Culturefix Gallery

9 Clinton Street, New York, NY

cash bar
copies of Saucy on sale in the gallery

____________________________________________________________

Saucy Issue 2 was printed with help from our friends at Newspaper Club in a limited run of 150 copies.

This is a kthread project; suggested donation of $10 for each copy pays for printing and groceries for the next issue. Saucy Issue 2 is only available at the September 27, 2011 New York launch party. For inquiries about Saucy, please contact hello@thesaucymag.com

This morning’s question: Seltzer or Club Soda?
For the scallion pancake recipe I’m creating for the Saucy summer issue, I have been working through two issues too: crispness, and saltiness.
And I had to find out how seltzer and club soda are actually different.
Turns out seltzer has no salt, and that the sodium in club soda does indeed make for a sweeter pancake – not what I was after. The sodium also dampens the carbonation in my experiments, which makes for a slightly less crisp pancake. You can see the holes in the pancakes in the picture.
Preliminary testing reveals: Seltzer is the better choice for a fizzier, more assertive savory pancake. Good to remember that you are dipping these in soy sauce, the great umami sodium representative of some Asian cultures.
Next I’m working through how to slice the scallions effectively. My hunch is that a short dice will do nicely.
Right now the batter ratio is 1 part flour to 1.5 parts carbonated liquid (wetter than the usual batters for these, but I’m also partial to thinner pancakes).
All for you, Saucy Mag readers and readers-to-be. More Saucy food adventures here on the Tumblr and Twitter.

This morning’s question: Seltzer or Club Soda?

For the scallion pancake recipe I’m creating for the Saucy summer issue, I have been working through two issues too: crispness, and saltiness.

And I had to find out how seltzer and club soda are actually different.

Turns out seltzer has no salt, and that the sodium in club soda does indeed make for a sweeter pancake – not what I was after. The sodium also dampens the carbonation in my experiments, which makes for a slightly less crisp pancake. You can see the holes in the pancakes in the picture.

Preliminary testing reveals: Seltzer is the better choice for a fizzier, more assertive savory pancake. Good to remember that you are dipping these in soy sauce, the great umami sodium representative of some Asian cultures.

Next I’m working through how to slice the scallions effectively. My hunch is that a short dice will do nicely.

Right now the batter ratio is 1 part flour to 1.5 parts carbonated liquid (wetter than the usual batters for these, but I’m also partial to thinner pancakes).

All for you, Saucy Mag readers and readers-to-be. More Saucy food adventures here on the Tumblr and Twitter.